Knack On Reissue

Knack On Reissue

Moslang-Guhl

(from JIM O'ROURKE'S liner notes...)" "Moslang-Guhl". You'd be forgiven if you thought it was food. It's not, but they use food. previous to Voice Crack, Norbert Moslang and Andy Guhl were longhair troublemakers on the European improvising scene, more power to them. Their first record "Deep Voices" (FMP 510) pictured the boys rocking out on a variety of very small percussion and very large reeds. There are "home-made instruments", not so odd for the time, there was Hugh Davies, Michael Wiszwicz even Evan Parker was rockin an oscillator. But somewhere in St. Gallen, Switzerland, these guys were doing their homework. "Knack On" was released in 82, and in the interim, they must have come upon something that sent them on towards their path to Voice Crack. On this record you'll here them crossing the line, moving past the improv w/electronics sound of the Tony Oxley/Allan Davies, Paul Lovens/Paul Lytton, AMM, MEV etc. axis, jumping headfirst into everyday SOUND. There is great moment, maybe 18 minutes into the recording where you can here someone drop their glass. it works perfectly. I can't think of a Voice Crack show I've seen where someone hasn't dropped their glass. (I'm always holding one in case no one does their duty) but that's the beauty of moslang/guhl/voice crack. Where is the line?? To see someone playing a bunch of christmas tree ornaments, a speak and spell (take that Experimental Audio Research!), a flashlight, with very little of the distracting "expression", yet hearing a wild symphony of ever changing textures, and still hear the IDEAS, well, "rock on", more like. Moslang and Guhl are also artists in the more traditional sense, their installations only emphasize this sense of separation from these "cracked every day electronics" as they brilliantly call them, and the presupposed idea of them as performers. Enough intellectualizing. Back to food. What's with this theme of wasted consumerism, broken household items, oscillators powered by fruit, a remote control screwing up reception on a shortwave, left over building materials, trash, as some would call it. I've often wondered about their "swiss-ness". St. Gallen may not be Geneva and Zurich , but it's still Switzerland (really, check a map! actually check for me, now I'm not so sure..) There is a strain of Swiss improvisers, Gunter Muller, Andreas Bosshard, Christian Marclay, Jacques Widmer, Norbert Moslang, Andy Guhl, what's in common? They're Swiss! No, really, there is this interest in using what's left over, be it old records, junkyard scraps, rebuilt speakers, even a bridge. What's goin on? I'm not giving answers, but it sure is something to think about. Their next record "Voice Crack" (also UhlKlang, '84) pictures them scattering what looks like mutant creations of Rolf Julius throughout the floor of a St Gallen gallery. With the arrival of Knut Remond on 1990's "Earflash" they were Voice Crack. And any thought of them playing at Total Music Meeting is about as rational as a Lynyrd Skynyrd reunion. But on they roar, they're still rockin. For years are streamlining their sound, it's more seamless, hell they're even going into studios to record but there's something still rough, something still unsettling, something unnameable: zzzzmakrckkkpppchkachkapbtzzzzshhhkkktztztztztbbbbbbsheeeeeeeping!" (...ahem) For anyone interested in the secret history of industrial or the new wave in electronic music, this is a must! Voice Crack continues to rock the world with their steel-bending electro-warpage.

(UMS217CD)

$13.00